As I See It

by Mary Schamehorn

Mary Schamehorn

May 27, 2015


This week's pictures will bring back memories for those of us who grew up here. The first was taken in December of 1962 and was a familiar sight at Christmas time. Bandon Lions Dutch Reichlein, left, and Carroll Nettleton, joined Santa (under the marquee) and other Lions to give out oranges and Christmas stockings to area youngsters . . . including Ron Moody and his little sister, Linda, who didn't mind posing for the camera. In the back is their mother, Phyllis, with younger brother, Mitch. The theater was next to Capps Motor Co., and across the street (Chicago) you can see Merritt J. Senter's insurance/real estate office.

Bandon Lions handing out oranges & Christmas stockings, 1962
Bandon Lions handing out oranges & Christmas stockings, 1962

The second picture will give you another view of what was known after the Fire as "New Bandon Theatre." I still remember sitting on the high stools at Tuttle's Fountain for an ice cream soda . . . but probably a bit later than this picture was taken. As you can see, there is a service station next to the theater, and probably one across the street as well, so this was obviously taken before Capps built their big showroom/garage.

New Bandon Theatre, after the fire
New Bandon Theatre, after the fire

The third picture, probably taken in 1977, shows tanks being dug up alongside the Shell station (between Shell and the Standard station). Across the street is Old City Hall Fish & Chips, which was a popular eating place, and a great dancing spot in the early '80s. The Shell station was located on the north side of Highway 101 at Fillmore, across the street from the Coast Lumber Yard.

Tanks being dug up alongside the Shell station, 1977
Tanks being dug up alongside the Shell station, 1977

*           *           *

I need to apologize for this week's column. I have pretty much been out of the loop for 12 days with what could be strep throat, or a very serious cold which has now lodged itself in my ears. At any rate, I didn't make it to the dock for the Memorial Day activities . . . or much of anywhere else, for that matter.

*           *           *

I have learned that long-time Bandon resident (in fact he may have been born here) Hugh McNeil is observing his 95th birthday Monday (May 25.) I believe he is living at the Myrtle Point Care Center. At any rate we wish the long-time commercial fisherman and Bandon Port Commissioner best wishes and hope family members will be able to join him for his birthday.

*           *           *

I am not sure why Facebook seems to bring out the nastiness in people, but I noticed a post Saturday night which thanked Kristin Kloman, the Bandon, Oregon Facebook monitor (for lack of a better word), for deleting a particularly mean post. Others apparently saw it as several commented on how mean the post was.

I don't know what it said, but having been the recipient of some pretty mean posts myself, I can only say it seems to be a sign of the times.

I often wonder what happened to civility . . .

*           *           *

One of my all-time favorite Bandon High School graduates, Stanley Goodell, posted on his Facebook page after running the 2015 Boston Marathon.

Stan says: "In November of 1995, I ran my first official marathon in Seattle . . . 20 years later and 25 marathons total (including four Bostons), I'm giving up the long 20-mile training runs at the wee hours of the morning and moving on to the short races (half marathons/10 milers. Running Boston 2015 was a two-year bucket list goal and I thank the good Lord for allowing me to stay injury free and to maintain my fitness level to accomplish a true disciplined feat. I'm cancer free (just past the four-year mark) and knee surgery didn't keep me from cranking out the miles with all my great running buddies. Thanks to all of you who carried me through my goals with well wishes and support . . .my long term goal "keep both feet above the ground."

The 1972 graduate of BHS was honored as the Southwestern Distinguished alumni for 2013.

Stan was a great athlete at BHS, and later went on to run cross country and track at SWOCC and graduate in 1974 with an associate's degree in police science. He coached cross country and track at Hidden Valley High School in Grants Pass for a total of 35 years as a coach.

*           *           *

I received Senator Jeff Kruse's e-newsletter this week . . .and his subject was "pot ...again."

He said he has received a lot of phone calls and emails on the subject of marijuana . . . "While a good number of these have been thoughtful and courteous, a large number have been vulgar and even threatening. To those in the latter category, if you are trying to make a valid point with a legislator, you are going about it the wrong way. I can't speak for my colleagues, but personally I don't respond to such tactics and have little respect for those who use them," said Senator Kruse.

Kruse told his readers he is a recovering addict, and has been drug and alcohol free for 29 years, "but among the other things I did, I was a daily pot smoker for 18 years. Additionally I have been involved legislatively with the medical marijuana program since the passage of the ballot measure in 1998."

He said he went into this session with two primary objectives: "to protect the integrity of the medical program and the second was to attempt to end the black market sales in Oregon. Senate Bill 964 (which deals with the medical program) goes a long way to achieving those objectives," said Kruse.

He goes on to respond to questions as to why the legislature is dealing with the medical marijuana program when Ballot Measure 91 was about recreational use.

"The short answer is because of the direction we have received from the federal government on the subject. We need to remember that pot is a schedule 1 narcotic at the federal level, and they expect a much higher level of accountability than we currently have in the system, which is actually no accountability at all.

"For example, if we assume two pounds of pot for each of the 71,000 patients that would give us a total of 142,000 pounds accounted for the system. However, the conservative estimates from OSU tell us there is well over a million pounds being produced, and other estimates take us to a much larger number. There is no way we can claim we know where the pot being produced is going, but one would have to assume it is going into the black market."

He adds that according to a memo from the US Dept. of Justice "this is a red flag which could jeopardize the recreational program."

If people are really interested in what is happening with SB 964 they may want to keep track of it on the Internet.

It's obvious the state of Oregon is now on the federal government's radar, which requires the state to tighten up its regulations . . .even though they may be hesitant to do so.

*           *           *

Every time I see, or hear about, someone with Alzheimer's disease, I wonder why scientists can't at least figure out what causes this debilitating disease.

I read recently that Duke University scientists have potentially discovered new avenues for treatment.

"They observed that in Alzheimer's, immune cells that normally protect the brain instead begin to consume a vital nutrient called arginine.

"By blocking this process with a drug, they were able to prevent the formation of 'plaques' in the brain that are characteristics of Alzheimer's, and also halted memory loss in the mice.

"What's more is that they were researching with a drug that has already begun human trials for cancer treatments ... possibly paving the way for clinical trials in the near future.

"While no technique that is tested in an animal can be guaranteed to work the same way in humans, the findings are particularly encouraging because, until now, the exact role of the immune system and Alzheimer's was completely unknown."

*           *           *

It's not unusual to hear about someone hitting a deer, but to learn that the deer killed a person in another vehicle is pretty unusual.

This happened recently on Highway 126 west of Eugene. A 2000 Ford Focus, operated by a 54-year-old man from Veneta, struck a deer in the roadway. After impact, the deer went airborne and into the path of a westbound 2000 Freightliner Truck operated by Jesse Bastien, 37, of Eugene.

The deer struck the windshield directly in front of Bastien and entered the passenger compartment, striking him. The man was able to drive the truck to the shoulder of the road, but passing motorists noted he was not conscious or breathing and began CPR. He was taken to Sacred Heart where he died from neck and head trauma.

From the pictures, it appeared to be an Oroweat bread truck (and yes, that's the way they spell wheat.)

Talk about being in the wrong place at the wrong time . . .




As I See It

by Mary Schamehorn

Mary Schamehorn

May 20, 2015


The first history photo I am sharing this week was taken in the heart of Old Town and features Bonnie Joyce giving rides in her horse-drawn wagon. But it's the buildings in the background that are of interest. I believe this was taken in the early '80s, but I'm not sure of the exact date because the envelope wasn't dated. The horse is in front of the Clock Tower building, which at that time was the home of Downtown Chiropractic Center owned by Chuck Meece. More recently it was the home of Beth and Ed Wood's Timeless Accents business. It has since been rented to a Gold Beach woman for her business. In the background is 230 Second Street Gallery, and next to it is a small barbershop. The barbershop was later torn down and is now part of the building that houses Second Street Gallery and Coastal Mist. At the far left is the building that now houses Bill and Louise Moore's Inner Garden shop, which many years ago was the Arcade Tavern and later La Jean Rose clothing store, opened by Alice Stadelman in 1989.

Bonnie Joyce giving rides in her horse-drawn wagon, early '80s
Bonnie Joyce giving rides in her horse-drawn wagon, early '80s

The second picture was taken in March of 1962 after the new Bullards Bridge warning signal was hung across the highway by the state. In those days, it was necessary to open the bridge for large vessels going to and from the mill on the east side of the bridge, but that seldom happens anymore with the closure of the mill.

New Bullards Bridge warning signal, 1962
New Bullards Bridge warning signal, 1962

The third picture features the Continuum Center, also taken in the early '80s, when it was owned by Hugh and Ruth Harrison and featured their Life After Death hologram exhibit. In the front was a primarily metaphysical book store operated by Jane and Ray Comerford. In the mid-80s, the building was purchased by Bob and Joyce Webb, and is still owned today by the Webb family. Shops in the building today are Pacific Blues, Kimberly's Book Nook, By The Sea Art Gallery, Neat Old Stuff, Patina and Heavy Metal Designs.

Continuum Center, early '80s
Continuum Center, early '80s

*           *           *

If the state legislature does not grant the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's request for increased license and tag fees, it will be bad news for Bandon.

Curt Melcher, the director, said that the loss of the anticipated $9.15 million in revenue would lead to the cutting of 42 positions ... seven at Salem headquarters and 35 in the field.

"In the Fish Division, it would mean the elimination of the Bandon and Alsea River fish hatcheries, the Oregon Hatchery Research Center, and the North Santiam River summer steelhead program at Leaburg Hatchery on the McKenzie River," according to an article in the Statesman Journal of Salem.

The Bandon Fish Hatchery has been here for many years, and it would certainly be a shame to see it close.

*           *           *

My long-time friends, Pete and Joan Goodbrod, have sold their beautiful, well-maintained home on Ninth Street and have moved to Pacific View to make it easier for Pete, who suffers from debilitating Parkinson's Disease. Their daughter Michelle and her husband, Bill White, were down last weekend to help with their move and to get things ready for their big garage sale. They have lots of furniture that they won't be taking with them.

Pete, who was a star on the Oregon State University (then College) baseball team that went to the national championships, came to Bandon in the '50s to play semi-pro baseball, met Joanie and they've lived here all their married life.

They often took me along on their baseball trips to semi-pro games when Pete was a member of the team. I learned to love baseball at an early age and remember that as a chubby little teenager, I had a crush on just about every one of the players. Many of them worked at Moore Mill (where I worked in the office for a short time before I started my journalism career) and played for the Bandon Millers semi-pro team.

I think Joan said their house was listed only two weeks before it sold . . . which is a testament to the love and care they have put into their property over the years. One look at the home and grounds and you would know that it had been well maintained . . . Joan is a little like me in that respect.

*           *           *

I used to think that I didn't like aged cheese, but, believe me, I've changed my mind. As we left the Face Rock Creamery's reception last week, each person was given a bright blue sack with an 8-oz. chunk of extra aged cheddar (aged two years).

The label says: "The best gets better with age! Our Extra Aged Cheddar is intense, sharp, and luxurious while maintaining our signature smooth buttery flavor."

FRC described its aged cheese much better than I could.

All I can say is that it is absolutely fabulous. It doesn't crumble into little shards and it is creamy and smooth.

Not sure how much it costs, but I do know that this will be my new go-to cheese. It's that good . . .

*           *           *

Bandon was definitely in the news last week as Bandon Dunes Golf Resort hosted its fifth national tournament, the USGA women's amateur at Pacific Dunes.

In spite of rain forecast for the last two days of the tournament, Tuesday and Wednesday, the weather gods were kind and there was no rain and the winds were calm.

Fox News One, which brought a huge crew of over 100 (I've heard numbers ranging up to 200 people), televised the tournament both Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons, and I watched both days. I saw parts of our local coastline that I had not ever seen, and it was gorgeous. The compliments that the resort and Bandon in general received were mind-blowing.

Bandon Dunes Golf Resort continues to put Bandon on the map. We could never afford to pay for the kind of publicity we received last week for staging such a tremendous event.

I spoke to a friend, who works at a local motel, who said several of those coming with the Fox crew indicated they would be back to Bandon ... with their families.

*           *           *

That wasn't the only big event last week. Bandon Showcase hosted a concert Wednesday night featuring famed Irish tenor Anthony Kearns, who proved to be extremely popular with the audience. A Showcase official said that since he didn't have to be at his next gig until Saturday night (in Astoria) he spent an extra day visit Bandon.

She said that after the show, he so much wanted to go to Foley's Irish Pub, but when they got there they found it had closed for the evening. So they ended up going to the Arcade where they partied with a big crowd of caddies and others who were celebrating the finish of the highly successful golf tournament.

"We stayed until closing, and Anthony even sang for them," said the Showcase officer.

She added that Kearns' pianist, who stole the show with his jokes and rhythm, is over 90 years old . . .

*           *           *

Bandon Showcase has already announced its 2015-16 season, which will feature The Diamonds on Sept. 24; Craicmore (A Celtic Yuletide Christmas), Dec. 10; Barefoot Movement (a bluegrass band), March 12, 2016; and the Kingston Trio, Monday, May 23, 2016.

Looks like a great season of entertainment. Season tickets are $100, and people can write to Bandon Showcase at P.O. Box 1958, to order tickets or to obtain more information.

*           *           *

I recently sent a letter to my old friend Dale Shaffar, who has lived most of his life in Powers, asking him for his late wife's coconut bread recipe. I had it years ago and mother often made the bread, which was more like a rich cake, and it was wonderful. But I have lost the recipe and figured he would be happy to send it to me.

I hadn't heard anything from him . . . until several weeks later I received the card in the mail. It had been returned for lack of a sufficient address.

I know he has a post office box (and believe me there aren't many of them in Powers), so I put P.O. Box on the envelope.

And, to top it off, he lives a stone's throw away from the post office.

I have had many letters put in my box by the crew at the Bandon post office that did not have a "complete" address (often senders will use my street address which is not valid because I have always had a post office box), but it always seems to get to me.

But not in Powers . . .

*           *           *

A comprehensive U.S. report (in Governing magazine) showed that Oregon not only has the worst graduation rates in the nation, but it's holding "the country back from achieving its graduation rate goals."

The 2015 Building a Grad National report analyzed 2013 graduation rate data from every state in the nation. While the national average reached a record high of 81.4 percent, the four-year graduation rate in October was only 69 percent.

"Furthermore," the article points out," Oregon hadn't improved from the year before, showing stagnation as the last remaining state with graduation rates lower than 70 percent."

I decided to look up spending rates per pupil and discovered that in 2011-12, Oregon ranked 24th in the nation per student at $11,629, followed in 25th place by Washington ($11,599). California was 34th with a per pupil spending rate of $10,536.

Per student spending ranged from a high in Vermont of $21,924 and New York ($19,513) to a low of $8,247 in Utah, $8,813 in Mississippi, $9,053 in Florida and $9,101 in Kentucky.

Oregon ranked 14th for average teacher salaries ($57,348) just above the national average.

It would be interesting to hear from educators as to why they think Oregon's graduation rate is so low.

*           *           *

Was glad to see Peggi Towne back at the Old Town Market after being in the hospital for nearly a week with a severe case of diverticulosis (or just divertic as she referred to it). It resulted in her having a number of blood transfusions.

She's on the mend now. Believe me the market would not be the same without John and Peggi, whose caring, friendly ways have endeared them to the hearts of vendors and customers alike.

*           *           *

I want to share a few more statistics that I've picked out of Governing Magazine. The first was is: 80 percent . . . Portion of California's water that's consumed by farming. Gov. Jerry Brown recently announced the state's first mandatory water restrictions, but they mostly apply to urban and suburban water usage.

Another: 40 to 90 percent: Range of parked cars with disability placards or license plates on 10 blocks in Washington, D.C. Only 5.3 percent of working-age Americans have ambulatory disability, according to The Washington Post.




As I See It

by Mary Schamehorn

Mary Schamehorn

May 13, 2015


The first picture I am sharing this week was taken in August 1977 from a vantage point behind the old Moore Mill Truck Shop, which can be seen at the far left. In front of the smaller vessel is what remained after Mike Erdman's fishing boat, "The Waves," caught fire and burned the previous day. Especially interesting are the amount of boats tied eight or nine deep at the dock in true testament to the thriving commercial fishing industry that us old-timers remember so well. Towering in the background, to the left of the boats, was lumber piled high on what is now the parking lot across from the Old Town Market. That building, originally called the blue building and now the green building, had not yet been constructed.

Behind the old Moore Mill Truck Shop, 1977
Behind the old Moore Mill Truck Shop, 1977

The second photo features Connie Cooper, left, and Dorothy Harris Waldrop, pointing to a big sign urging people to donate to the community scholarship fund. This was taken in May of 1973. Dorothy, who was married to one-time mayor and later county commissioner Eddie Waldrop, was the consummate volunteer, who spent her adults years helping to make the community a better place to live.

Connie Cooper and Dorothy Harris Waldrop, 1973
Connie Cooper and Dorothy Harris Waldrop, 1973

The third picture was taken at the intersection of First Street and Chicago Avenue alongside of what is now the Wheelhouse (before there were windows on the west side of the building). At this time, in the early '80s, the Bandon Fisheries office was upstairs where the Crow's Nest is now. As you can see, this was before the Port of Bandon built its office in the middle of the Chicago Avenue right of way that now houses the Loft restaurant and downstairs, the Loft Deli.

The intersection of First Street and Chicago Avenue
The intersection of First Street and Chicago Avenue, early '80s

I can clearly remember getting the call at the paper (and I was also on the city council) about a big sink hole in the middle of the street. And they weren't exaggerating. There was a huge hole right in the middle of the intersection, caused by an underground pipe (sewer, I think) that leaked long enough to completely erode the ground below the street. It was just fortunate that no one ended up driving into the hole, which was big enough to engulf a vehicle.

*           *           *

I just happened to be looking at The Oregonian online Saturday night when I discovered an article about a Coos County man, whose remains had been positively identified . . . more than 60 years after he had been reported missing in action in the Korean War. He was identified as Ben Lee Brown of Four Mile, south of Bandon.

Although it mentioned two siblings, the article gave no names, but said neither one wanted to comment. I was sure I knew the family ... and I was right.

The Browns were a large and well-known family in the Four Mile area, and one of them still lives here. Brother Ted (married to Ellen) Brown died earlier this year. Of the nine children, only Nancy Brown, a Bandon beautician, and her sister, Shirley Albro, of McKinleyville, Calif., are still alive. Another brother, Floyd (who was married to Vivian Kranick), died in 2009. It was in his obituary that I saw that his brother, Benny, had preceded him in death, as had his sisters, Margaret Stewart and Ann Baggett.

Cpt. Ben Lee Brown had only recently joined the Army when, at the age of 17, he was reported to be missing in action in February of 1951 in South Korea. He was presumed dead on Dec. 31, 1953.

The story involves the remains of several missing servicemen who ended up in the same casket, and it was only later through DNA testing that they were positively identified. Ben Lee Brown was "accounted for" on April 10, 2015, and will be laid to rest Friday at Roseburg National Cemetery.

*           *           *

By now some of you may have heard that things got a bit heated at the city council meeting last Monday night . . . and the continuation of the meeting on Tuesday . . . regarding where medical marijuana dispensaries would be allowed to locate in Bandon, or even if they would.

My concerns, which some felt were a little too strongly expressed, had to do with what I consider to be extreme abuse in the system, that was originally designed to provide medicinal marijuana to "critically ill and dying Oregonians." That is the way it was sold to the voters, according to an article in The Oregonian.

But it wasn't until I read the lengthy article in Saturday's Register-Guard that I realized just how far out of control the system has become. I told my long-time friend and fellow councilor Brian Vick (who didn't exactly share my concerns) that I would save him a copy of the paper in case he would like to read it.

The medical marijuana business has gotten so large that a survey by an Oregon State University instructor, Seth Crawford, found that licensed medical marijuana growers produce three to five times more marijuana than Oregon's total estimated demand of about 140,000 pounds a year (based on the number of permit holders which has ballooned in the last few years.)

"That is a crop with an annual value of $1 billion (yes, that's a b), Crawford estimates, for a medical program market that, legally, is not supposed to generate profits for anyone.

"Even strong supporters acknowledge that growers grow and sell thousands of pounds of excess marijuana into the black market, mostly in other states."

At any rate, after much back and forth debate, the council took the ordinance drafted by the planning commission, enlarged the restricted areas around schools from 1,000 feet to 1,500 feet, and added the Head Start center on Fillmore. The main reason for including this, where children are of pre-school age, is because the land across the street is zoned light industrial, which is one of the only two zones (the other is commercial) where it would be allowed. It was then unanimously approved by the council.

Not only is the legislature now dealing with what kind of restrictions to impose on recreational marijuana, but they are also planning to increase the restrictions on medical, to keep as much as possible from going into the high-profit black market. It's called drug dealing ...

Stay tuned . . . .

*           *           *

If you haven't voted yet, and you live in the Bandon Port District, I would like to recommend Don Starbuck for the contested seat on the port commission that has four candidates.

Don served on the City's water resource committee and was a tireless worker who always kept himself well informed of the issues. Before he moved to Bandon, he also served as mayor of a small town.

I highly recommend Don Starbuck for port commissioner.

*           *           *

The long-awaited opening of The Beverage Barn is scheduled for this morning (Monday) at 10 a.m. and from what I've heard Lori and Barry Osborne have many surprises in store for their customers. I can't wait to see what they've done with the former Bandon Pharmacy building. What they've done outside is stunning, and I know they have many new products and services ready to share with the community, including craft beers, imports, domestic and 28 different options from their Growler station. They will also be carrying a full line of amazing wines, specializing in Oregon Pinots.

The drive through will remain closed for a few more weeks while they work everything out inside.

Their liquor and cigar store was closed Sunday to make the move to The Beverage Barn.

*           *           *

I was among a group who attended Face Rock Creamery's reception Friday night where we learned first-hand of what FRC has accomplished in the two short years since they opened in May of 2013. The markets where their cheese is being sold have greatly expanded in the last year ... to include high-volume places like Costco, Fred Meyer and the Haggen grocery chain (who bought many Safeway stores).

They also announced, and shared with us, a new ice cream developed by Umpqua Dairy known as Face Rock Cranberry Walnut Cheesecake. It was a real treat as was, of course, the many varieties of cheese we sampled and a two-year-old block of extra aged cheddar that we were given to take home.

Every time I drive by I think proudly of the role the City played in helping Greg Drobot and Daniel Graham make this beautiful facility possible.

*           *           *

I just returned from MarLo Dance Studio's production of Alice In Wonderland. It was absolutely fabulous. Each time I think Maria Merriam's shows can't get any better ... they do.

Not only is the dancing always terrific, but the costumes were fabulous and the backdrops really added to the ambience.

Don't forget Wednesday night the Bandon Showcase is sponsoring the appearance of Irish Tenor Anthony Kearns. I haven't heard if the tickets are sold out, but if not you might want to check at Bandon Mercantile to see if there are any left. It will be a great show.




As I See It

by Mary Schamehorn

Mary Schamehorn

May 06, 2015


The first picture that I am sharing this week brings back memories ... not necessarily good. This photos shows a Robertson's truck (with Earle at the controls of the hoist) lifting a plane out of the gorse at the end of the runway at the south end of the Bandon State Airport. The date was April of 1972 and the man and his family had flown to Bandon for the aero club's annual fly-in crab feed. I was there with my friend Jim Wilson, manager of Coos-Curry Electric and a member of the Bandon Aero Club. At that time, I had never flown and he had promised to take me up in his plane as soon as the crab feed was over.

Lifting a plane out of the gorse, 1972
Lifting a plane out of the gorse, 1972

Probably a hundred people were sitting around plywood tables in the big hangar when this plane took off ... but failed to gain enough altitude and crashed into the gorse at the end of the runway. Everything was eerily quiet for a few seconds until everyone poured out of the hangar. Because of the dense gorse, we could not see the plane, but one of the members yelled to the pilot to see if everyone was OK. He said no, they needed an ambulance. Then the work began. Led by Jim Wilson, people grabbed all the food off the plywood tables, grabbed the plywood and began using them as a footpath through the gorse. I was not that far behind with my trusty camera.

Fortunately no one was seriously injured, but it was a frightening scene. After the injured person had been taken away and the family assisted, Jim turned to me and said: "Well are you ready to go up." My reaction was, of course, "are you crazy?" But he said, "if you don't go up now, you may never fly," and I knew he was right. But it took all the courage I could muster to climb into his small plane ... but I did.

This picture does not show the damage to the front of the plane which basically nose-dived into the gorse. There was no doubt in anyone's mind that day that the thick gorse had provided a cushion, or the accident could have been so much worse.

The man standing there watching is Howard Kehl, who was responsible for a lot of the good things that happened at the airport in those days.

Speaking of the airport, the second picture was taken on Cranberry Festival weekend in 1974 during the pancake breakfast hosted by aero club members. On hand that morning was Congressman John Dellenback (wearing his famous bowtie), who is pictured with pilots David L. Davis, Howard Kehl and my uncle, L. L. Felsheim. Also at the breakfast were Cranberry Queen Cindy Goodbrod and her court.

Cranberry Festival weekend in 1974
Cranberry Festival weekend in 1974

The third picture was taken before the fire and came from a large glass negative given to me many years ago by Bud Huff. The big white flat-roofed building on the waterfront was the Westlund Hotel, which is now the site of the port's green building, home of the Old Town Market. Directly across the street is The Golden Rule, which located to Second Street (now the home of the Continuum) after the Fire of 1936.

Before the Fire of 1936
Before the Fire of 1936

*           *           *

It was great to see the Old Town Market open this weekend ... with one not-so-small exception: the wind. I may be "old," but I am strong, and both Friday and Saturday, it was all I could do to get in or out of my car. I actually had to hold the door with my foot in order to have the strength to hold the door . . . which was either prepared to blow backward or crush my legs. That's how strong the wind was both Friday, Saturday and it was still blowing, although not as hard, Sunday.

I know that it probably depends on where you were over the weekend as to how hard the wind blew at your location, as there are definitely places where you can escape the strong north wind, but the market (at its riverfront location) is not one of them.

I felt truly sorry for the three or four vendors who were in front of the building.

We can only hope that the wind will not be as strong all summer, but if it is, it will pose a big problem for the market.

My suggestion is that the port of Bandon install some kind of secure screen along the river for 30 or 40 feet to protect both the vendors and the people trying to get into the market.

In fact, I feel so strongly about it, that I will pledge the first $100 to make it happen.

After purchasing a driftwood planter, complete with flowering plant, at the Good Earth Community Garden silent auction (along with a beautiful planting bench made by market manager John Towne), I tried to cross the parking lot to get it into my car. But realizing it was about to be blown into oblivion, I asked John if I could park for a short time in the no-parking area and he said I could. I was finally able to get it into my car with the help of one of the vendors.

I hope the port takes me up on my offer. I am sure others will chip in also if it would mean some kind of wind barrier for the market ... which continues to get better and better every year. It's a great place to spend Friday and Saturday.

*           *           *

I'm having trouble with my computer again. If I leave out a letter and go back to insert it, it deletes the next letter. I know I have hit some strange key and it's not the first time it has happened; unfortunately I can't remember what I did to fix it. I actually tried to insert the word Plexiglas screen when talking about the wind at the market, but I finally gave up as I didn't want to have to type the same paragraph over again.

It's bad enough to have to come in and write my column every Sunday, especially when it's sunny outside, but when my computer gives me fits, it makes it even harder. Maybe someone will email me and let me know how to fix it (marys@coosnet.com).

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Facebook lit up Saturday night when people east of town, particularly in the area of Ohio Avenue, heard two loud booms.

There were all sorts of ideas as to what it was, until someone called the sheriff's office (I think that was the department) and was told that it was a celebration of life. When Amy came home from Eugene, her husband Wayne said he also heard it and they figured out that it was probably in memory of Don Adams, whose funeral was Saturday. And the family lives in the Ohio Avenue area.

If my column looks a bit disjoined it's because of that stupid backspace thing. I again made a mistake and every time I tried to add a letter, I lost another so I just waited until I came to a word that wasn't needed and left it out. This is getting old . . . real fast. Oops I see I said disjoined when I meant disjointed, but I am not going back to fix it unless I want to start that paragraph over ... and I don't.

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The May Day parade/protest in downtown Portland Friday, which was supposed to last only a couple of hours, turned a bit ugly when protesters refused to leave, which ended up with long lines of drivers trying to get home from work and others locked inside buildings in the core area where the hundreds of protesters gathered.

One TV announcer said that "while infringing on other people's rights, the message (of the protesters) was probably lost on the people who are stuck in cars or inside locked stores downtown."

But compared to what my sister and I watched on CNN Monday night, that was nothing. We both sat glued to our TVs for hours that night, and again the next night, struck by the sheer magnitude of what we were seeing in Baltimore. I cried, right along with the black pastor who watched his 50-unit low-income senior housing complex burned to the ground by the rioters.

Reporters said the last time they had seen or heard of anything like this was 50 years ago . . . in the Watts riots.

For the life of me I could not figure out why the mayor of Baltimore, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, waited until Tuesday night to institute a curfew, when groups of teenagers (fresh out of the classroom) ran rampant across the downtown area Monday night, spurred on by a Facebook post about a movie, which advocated for a 24-hour period of lawlessness.

People are proud that no one was killed ... but what about the 15 injured police officers, who were pelted by anything the thugs could lay their hands on?

There have been many insightful commentaries written this week about what happened in Baltimore and most of them are spot-on. Call it what you may, but it was rioting in every sense of the word.

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Governing Magazine, which I get both in the post office and on line, has interesting statistics every month. One interesting stat: 1.7 trillion . . . number of gallons of water California uses every year to grow almonds, which is more than the state's residents use indoors. Farms, however, are exempt from the state's water restrictions.

Another is: 15.76 percent ... the percent of Rhode Islanders 12 and older who reported using marijuana in the past month. That's the highest rate of any state in the nation. (I personally find that hard to believe considering the states where recreational marijuana is now legal).


previous columns by Mary Schamehorn