As I See It

by Mary Schamehorn

Mary Schamehorn

January 28, 2015


The first picture I am sharing this week is the Bandon City Hall taken during a flood in 1961. Attached to the City Hall was the fire department, and the small stone building next to it was the city jail. In the back was the city library. The building later became the Old City Hall restaurant, and today houses the Bandon Historical Society's wonderful museum. Note the service station across Fillmore from the City Hall, later Ray Hallinan's book and stationery store, and now Gibson Graphics. This building served as Bandon's City Hall until the new one was dedicated in 1970.

City Hall during the flood of 1961
City Hall during the flood of 1961

The second picture, taken in May of 1958, shows a public works employee (on the hillside behind the pole) spraying the gorse. The Power Wagon belonged to Ground Spraying Inc. I can only imagine what kinds of chemicals were being sprayed.

Spraying gorse 1958
Spraying gorse 1958

The third picture, which I took during a University of Oregon track meet, features the late great Steve Prefontaine waving to the crowd after one of his many victories. Kenn Hess, the long-time sports editor of the Coos Bay Times (now The World), had asked me to cover the event for him and I came away with several good pictures (although this may not have been one of them as it's a big blurry).

Steve Prefontaine during a University of Oregon track meet
Steve Prefontaine during a University of Oregon track meet

As I am writing this on Sunday, Stan Goodell reminded me that it would have been Pre's 64th birthday, but as we all remember, he was killed in a car crash in the hills of Eugene many years ago. Pre was raised in Coos Bay and attended Marshfield High School before he went to Oregon where he became a world-class distance runner.

Stan also mentioned that Sunday was the 46th anniversary of the death of his younger brother, Allen, who died at the age of 14. Several weeks ago, while going through a box of treasures from the past, I came across a letter Allen had written to me at Western World from the hospital shortly before he died. Things like this are priceless ...

*           *           *

I attended the first-annual Relay For Life of Bandon kick-off party Saturday night, and it was a blast. We got to sample 12 different kinds of chili, choose our favorite (which ended up being one prepared by city councilor Peter Braun), bid on wonderful desserts and silent auction items, hear inspiring survivor stories and dance to live music.

A spokesman for the event posted this morning that they had raised $2,000 ... and still counting, which is good news.

This is the first year that Bandon will hold its own Relay For Life, slated for July 18-19 at the BHS track. Amy had a big story in last week's Western World for anyone who needs more information.

There was a big group of locals who put this on, but I want to personally thank Nancy Fitch-Noel, Amy Moss-Strong and Sarah Lakey for posting reminders as the day approached ... to make sure we wouldn't miss it.

*           *           *

The Oregonian carried a lengthy story this week about a local family, titled "Bankrupt farmers hid revenue, bank claims."

Banner Bank is accusing Allen and Carol Russell of creating a shell company to keep selling cranberries (some of which came from other local growers) while declaring personal bankruptcy in order to get out of repaying $743,844 in loans.

In its lawsuit, the Bank's lawsuit contends that the Russells defaulted on two loans and filed bankruptcy under the Russell Cranberry Co. name without ever mentioning they had created Bandon Cranberry Co. LLC to continue selling cranberries.

I talked to one of the growers at Christmastime who mentioned he had sold his fresh-fruit berries to the Russells, who had developed a market with Costco. At that time, he had not been paid for his crop, and was hoping to be paid in January.

The Oregonian writer reportedly contacted Carol Russell, who declined to comment on the litigation.

The article explains that the Russells declared bankruptcy in July 2012 and reached an agreement with the bank for the remainder of the three loans, made by Sterling Savings Bank (now Banner) in 2009 and 2010.

It was after that that the bank's attorney discovered the Russells had created the other company in February 2012, without disclosing it.

"After the discovery, the Russells continued making payments on the loans under terms of the agreement without incident until January 2014, well ahead of the prime selling season in November and December. At the time, they still owed a combined principal of $734,844.

"According to the lawsuit, the Russells sold 2014's cranberry crop as usual under the Bandon Cranberry Co. name, keeping the proceeds.

"The bank is asking the Russells give up their crops, farm products, inventory, equipment, accounts and other personal property used as collateral."

*           *           *

I received an email from one of my high school teachers, Dr. Lloyd M. Gabriel, who is an ex-prisoner of war. He taught social studies and American problems and his wife taught home economics and journalism.

Mr. Gabriel says: "January 30 brings back many memories. Our crew was shot down Jan. 30, 1944, and bailed out over Holland. One crew member was killed. Just thought I would share some thoughts with you. We are doing well. I am still active as State Commander of our Ex-POW Department."

He included a piece titled "Lest We Forget," and then added several pages of his own memories.

He talks about the 92-day march from Luft IV, where 6,000 men were marched out over a period of days in groups of 250-500 men. "We slept in barns, old buildings or on the ground. Our food supply gave us about 750 calories per day. Dysentery, lice, frostbite and general weakness was obvious. The German guards marched us into the American lines at Halle, Germany, just north of Leipzig. This was May 2, 1945 ... 92 days on the road.

"I went to the infirmary for help in controlling dysentery. The medic said I stunk ... where had I been? First, I had no bath for three months. Second, no toilet tissue for about two months. I had extra socks and this was the only change of clothing for three months. The medic deloused me, gave me new clothing and weighed me ... I weighed a solid 92 pounds.

"We have never formally been informed about the number of men who died on the march, but the estimates runs from 1,200 to 1,500.

"Much of the march is vague or blocked out in my psyche. However, many memories seem as if it was yesterday."

Lest we forget . . .

(I'm including a picture of Mr. Gabriel and members of his students taken when they were reading newspapers during a Great Decisions class. I can see Linda Sutherland, Jane Chappell (Germann), Joy Swenston (Tiffany), Kay Yockey, David Lorenz, Louie Bohles, Gary Johnson and John Gamble (front right). Sorry I can't ID them all. This was probably taken in 1958.)

Mister Gabriel and his students
Mister Gabriel and his students

*           *           *

The Class of 1975 is planning its 40-year reunion for Sunday, July 5, according to class member Nancy Streets, who is heading up the planning for the event.

A few of the ones who graduated that year include Kim Clausen (Stolz), Casey Cox, Debbie Dominy (Seibert), Betty Dornath (Albertson), Kim Geiszler (Forrest), Jerene Fraser (Shaffar), Cindy Goodbrod, John Haga, the late and one of my all-favorites Jim Hutchens, John McGinty, David Pierce, Sheila McNeil, Gerry Robertson, Therese Reilly (Kent), Judy Rogers (Tree), Jeff Sutherlin, Kay Waldrop, Jodie Van Leuven and Wayne Strong. I know at least two other class members are gone: Lans Leach and Paul MacDonald.

People also are reminded that the all-school reunion is still set for the afternoon of Aug. 22.

*           *           *

You've probably wondered about the green cross painted on Dr. Greg Aitchison's empty building at the south entrance to town. As most of us know, a green cross indicates a medical marijuana dispensary.

But since the law does not allow dispensaries to be sited closer than 1,000 feet from a school, the building will probably never house medical marijuana as it's too close to the Ocean Crest School.

I understand from a reliable source that the cross appeared when Dr. A was in town last summer, but no one seems to know why. Maybe someone thought it would be a good location for a medical marijuana dispensary, but since the law won't allow it, it's probably not going to occur.

The legislature is still working on the rules for the sale of recreational marijuana . . . stay tuned.




As I See It

by Mary Schamehorn

Mary Schamehorn

January 21, 2015


I chose the first picture in my history collection because it reminded me of the Bandon Rural Fire District's open house Saturday in observance of their 50-year anniversary. It was a great opportunity to tour their spacious facilities and see all the equipment ... both old and new. Bandon is so fortunate to have a fire department of this caliber, and although the city does not have its own fire department, we contract with the RFPD to provide protection for city residents. And Chief Lanny Boston and his crew are the best!

They gave out small firefighters' hats in red, black and pink to the little ones who attended the open house. And they looked just like those in picture No. 1, which features Joanne Metcalfe, back left, and Joan Goodbrod, back right, when Metcalfe Insurance gave out fire hats to children in 1973. I can't identify any of the youngsters but I am sure some of my readers can.

Children wearing firefighter's helmets 1973
Children wearing firefighter's helmets 1973

The second picture, taken in November of 1979, was the wonderful big wooden grandstand, which sat on the south side of the football field for many years on Dave Miller Field. The lumber was donated by the mill's owner, D. H. Miller, and it was built by volunteers from across the community. But the years took their toll on the stadium, and it was later torn down to make way for the metal risers on the north side of the field and the track. But it was never the same .... (I may have already used this in a previous column, and if I did, sorry)

Football field grandstand 1979
Football field grandstand 1979

The third picture, taken in October of 1973, came from an envelope titled "port dock work." Judging from the deterioration of the ramp, it appears that it is being removed from the water to make way for a ramp. But I'm really not sure.

Dock repairs 1973
Dock repairs 1973

*           *           *

January is a relatively slow time of year for tourism, and that's often the time of year when a few businesses close for a month or so. This year, Lloyd's is apparently closed for the winter, Foley's Irish Pub is closed until March and McFarlin's closed "forever." But we understand that the owner, Moxie Black, will eventually reopen, but under a different name. That's something to look forward to . .

*           *           *

Saturday I spent some time at the museum with Jim Proehl, a couple of Scout mothers, and a group of local Boy Scouts who were working on their Citizenship in the Community merit badge, and needed to talk to a "local elected official." And I was the one.

It was fun and the boys had plenty of questions for me and a few concerns, including what could be done about the number of "widow-makers" hanging from trees, particularly in the area of the school.

We all know they were referring to tree branches that are either hanging by a thread, or look like they could break loose in the next big storm. They wondered what they could do to help, and I suggested that they might want to walk around the community and make note of what they considered to be dangerous trees . . . and that information could be turned over to the city's tree committee, of which Mr. Proehl is a member. We are primarily talking trees in the city right of way.

It was a great discussion, and I learned that they may be attending a council meeting in the near future. Hope we (audience included) will be on our best behavior the night they visit . . . to learn how city government operates.

*           *           *

I was looking for something on the Internet the other day and my eye caught the words "Bandon Dunes," so I decided to click on the obituary of some 32-year-old guy, who died in his sleep at the home of his parents in Southfield, Mass.

He had graduated magna cum laude with a B.S. in mathematics and earned a master's in mathematics education at City College of New York.

"Among his favorite activities, Mr. (Timothy Miller) Richman excelled at the game of golf and started a Westchester golf meet-up group, where he met lifelong friends and traveled to play golf, most notably to Bandon Dunes in Oregon, his 'golf trip of a lifetime.' He also taught a city student to play and love golf."

It never did say how he died at such a young age, but certainly he was impressed with Bandon Dunes Golf Resort... enough so that it made his obituary.

*           *           *

I learned this week that the former priest at St. John's Episcopal Church, Beth Hoffmann, took a bad fall recently in her new home in Florida, where she moved to be closer to family and accept a call to another church after serving here for nearly three years.

In a letter to parishioners, thanking them for the going-away party, she mentioned that she tripped over their dog Max on the way to answer the door and completely dislocated her shoulder. "It was a horrifically painful injury that landed me in the emergency room. It took four tries and knocking me out to get my arm back in the socket, and I tore my rotator cuff. It is probably going to require surgery.

"All in all though we are doing okay. We love our new home and being close to family. The church is being very good to us, but I do miss all of you so much and you are often in my thoughts and prayers."

*           *           *

I was interested in an item in the World's "Go!" section in Saturday's paper concerning a woman who was searching for photos of six local Vietnam Veterans, who died in the war, including one from Bandon: Terry L. Sumerlin.

I remember Terry and his twin brother, Larry, well. They were members of the BHS Class of 1966 and Larry is the ex-husband of my long-time friend Jill Chappell.

The woman, Janna Hoehn, a volunteer with the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, Inc., was hoping that someone would send in pictures of the six men from Coos County. A similar article appeared in today's Sunday Oregonian, with names of those from the metropolitan area for whom they were seeking pictures.

I scanned in the picture of Terry from the yearbook and sent it to her. I also sent Jill an email to see if she would contact Larry and see if he might have other pictures. She said Bill Smith had also scanned the same photo and sent it in.

Jill had contacted the twins' older brother, Jim Sumerlin, who said that their home burned when the twins were seniors, so they weren't able to save family photos. Terry was only 19 when he died in 1967.

But it was what else Jill told me that I found interesting. She said of the two casualties of the Vietnam War from Bandon, both were named Terry and both were in the Class of 1966. The other was Terry Williams, son of well-known Bandonians, Joe and Olive Williams. Olive was the head cook at the school cafeteria for many years.

*           *           *

For awhile it looked like the Pacific Northwest's other sensational football team, the Seattle Seahawks, weren't going to repeat a trip to the Super Bowl this year after three and a half disastrous quarters of play ... which saw the Hawks star quarterback Russell Wilson throw a career-high four interceptions.

But after trailing by 16 at halftime, and doing almost nothing in the third quarter, Russell & Co. mounted what is now being called the greatest ever comeback in a championship game to score a TD in overtime on a "hail-Mary" type play to win the game.

I have seen some emotional finishes, but never anything like this on a national level. Wilson was sobbing so hard that they had to wait awhile to even interview him, and even then tears were streaming down his face.

I just wish the Oregon Ducks could have experienced the same kind of ending . . . but their season certainly made us Duck fans proud.

And now it's time to root for Seattle in the Super Bowl on Feb. 1.

*           *           *

I do enjoy watching football, but there is a statement that broadcasters make that does not set well with me, and that is: "They rang his bell pretty good," which means to me that another player has probably suffered a hit that could result in a concussion.

There is nothing "good" about "ringing someone's bell." Period!!

*           *           *

It was like Christmas in January when I went to the post office last Monday and came out with six packages of Shutterfly books, ranging from one with pictures of Patrick Creek Lodge (on Highway 199 east of Crescent City) to new versions of the black and white book filled with old pictures of Bandon.

There were also a couple that I had put together from my large folder of pelican pictures when they were here five or six years ago.

I have also put together several books of pictures from Bandon Playhouse productions, including "My Fair Lady" and "Chicago" and have the pictures ready to go for a book of the show "On Golden Pond."

I still can't find my pictures of The Sound of Music, but I am pretty sure they aren't on my computer ... although there are 28,000 picture files . . . mostly black and white . . . so they could be in there somewhere.




As I See It

by Mary Schamehorn

Mary Schamehorn

January 14, 2015


The first picture for this week's history lesson was taken in March of 1975 in the Ocean Crest School gym during a Folk Festival program. I can recognize Kenny Murray (in sports jersey at left) and Gary Remy (running past the second door). This gym will be the site of the all-school reunion on Saturday, Aug. 22, as Ocean Crest School is observing its 75th anniversary.

Ocean Crest School gym 1975
Ocean Crest School gym 1975

The second picture was taken in the late '70s or early '80s of the new boat basin under construction. You can see the Moore Mill Truck Shop in the far left, and also at the top left is Coast Lumber Yard and the old plumbing shop (where Bandon Mercantile is now located). Just east of there, along First Street at the corner of Elmira, is Ernie Panter's old building, which is now the site of the Moore Mill office. I am guessing at the date of this picture because I notice that the old hospital (replaced by a white trailer behind what is now the Wheelhouse) had already been torn down after suffering a fire in April of 1978. Behind the trailer, on Second Street, is the Bandon Theater, adjacent to Capps Motor Co (now Harbortown Events Center). Notice the series of buildings (Bandon Seafood, etc.) on the water side of First Street at the far right side of the photo. That is now the site of The Loft (former port office), and behind it on the dock is the Butler's charter boat office.

Bandon Boat Basin construction
Bandon Boat Basin construction

I took the third picture in October of 2007, from my friend Jason Altseimer's plane. This clearly shows the modern, new boat basin, and the new McNair Building, bottom left, and the Moore Mill office, on First Street to the right of the boat basin. Both Coast Lumber Yard and the Moore Mill Truck Shop are long gone.

Bandon Boat Basin October 2007
Bandon Boat Basin October 2007

*           *           *

I want my readers to know that Matt Winkel, our 20-year city manager, will be honored at a retirement party this Thursday afternoon (Jan. 15) from 2 to 4 p.m. at City Hall. Matt's last actual day in City Hall will be Friday, but since that could be a four-day holiday (Martin Luther King Day is Monday), for some people, we decided to have it Thursday. The new city manager, Chris Good, will be on the job Tuesday, Jan. 20.

At the very impressive art show at the hospital Sunday, I spoke to a Bandon woman who knew Chris when he worked for the City of Reno and she spoke very highly of him. She said she was thrilled to see that he would be our new city manager.

That's the kind of feedback we love to hear ...

*           *           *

I was sad, but not surprised, to see that the J.C. Penney Co. store at Pony Village Mall in North Bend is one of 40 stores that will be closed by the company.

For years, I bought my Gloria Vanderbilt jeans there. I am hard to fit and they were perfect (although I have gradually gone from a size 10 to a size 12), but they were always there when you needed a new pair . . . in lots of different shades of blue denim.

But enter a new CEO and everything changed. He didn't last long, but his impact remained as the quality of their clothing got cheaper and cheaper ... and the price more and more expensive.

Actually, since I quit working altogether, I seldom buy new clothes . . . but prefer to go to the closet and wear what I already have ... most of which came from Black Horse Boutique as well as gently used shops like Begin Agains and Brees.

Sad for Penney's employees . . .

*           *           *

The Sprague Theater was packed Saturday for the sold-out crowd who'd come to hear singer Ted Vigil present his "John Denver Musical Tribute." The show was one of four sponsored by the Bandon Showcase for the 2014-15 season.

Yes, Ted Vigil was good, but it was his sidekick, a mandolin player, Rich Landar, who really stole the show. Landar is a member of a Bluegrass band based in Portland called the Hillwilliams.

I truly enjoyed the first songs, but after the intermission, it got very loud. I do know that the Showcase hires people to take care of the sound, while theater manager Dave Reed handles the lights. I'm not sure if Vigil asked for it to be ramped up after intermission, or the sound people took it upon themselves to up the decibels, but the first six or seven songs were much easier to listen to. Maybe I'm just getting old ...

The show I am anxiously awaiting (and for which I've already purchased two tickets) is Anthony Kearns, star of the Irish Tenors, a well-known and much-loved trio of Irish singers. I have several of their CDs and a couple of DVDs. It's scheduled for Wednesday night, May 13. That show will definitely be sold out, so people should not wait until the proverbial "last minute" to get their tickets.

They can be purchased at Bandon Mercantile for $25.

Bandon Showcase is to be commended for bringing top-notch entertainment to the Sprague Theater, to complement the great productions of the Bandon Playhouse and New Artists Productions.

Bandon is indeed blessed . . .

*           *           *

Just a heads-up! A woman from San Jose posted on the Bandon, Oregon, Facebook page Sunday afternoon urging people to keep their gas caps locked. She said: "My friend lives on Bills Creek Lane and had his diesel drained from both tanks on his truck over the weekend."

*           *           *

Talk about a humbling experience. I have been anxiously awaiting my new "Bandon" books, filled with black and white pictures from my collection. And Wednesday it came.

The first thing I saw was the word memory on the front page spelled "mememory." I was very upset as you can imagine. I spend so much time proofing and editing other people's work . . . that you would think I would spend equally as much time editing my own.

Even with the extra "em" the book is fabulous and those who have seen it absolutely love it.

The problem is, it's very expensive to have these printed, and the four that I got Wednesday (two 8x8 lighthouse books and the two Bandon books) came to $128, and that was with a percentage off coupon. And to make matters worse, I had decided to make some changes to the Bandon book (before I got the first copies) because I noticed, as I was looking at the proofs, that four or five of the pictures were in the book twice, so I ordered two more ... WITHOUT paying any attention to the front cover. So soon I will have four Bandon books with memory spelled wrong.

If I were to reorder them tomorrow, the 8x10 Bandon books would be $39.99 plus postage (around $7.50) and the 8x8 lighthouse and beach scene books would be $29.99 plus postage, so you can see that they are not cheap. I know there are other places to order books like this, but the quality is excellent and I will probably stick with Shutterfly. I will probably sell the beach scenes for $40 and the Bandon books for $50.

Over the years, I have taken pictures of some of the top shows put on by locals, and I have now put together a book for the Bandon Playhouse productions of My Fair Lady and On Golden Pond (can't find my pictures of Sound of Music), one for MarLo Dance and another of Fiddler on the Roof Jr., a production of New Artists Productions. At this point, I have done all the design for My Fair Lady, Fiddler and MarLo, but have not ordered the books yet as I am hoping a coupon will come along that will help with the cost a bit. It is a very fun, expensive and time-consuming undertaking, but it is so great to see the finished product, and to realize that I can actually do something creative with my many thousands of pictures.

Lately, I haven't scanned in any of my old Western World negatives, but I'm sure I'll get back to that soon; you never know what "great picture from the past" is waiting in those archives of negatives . . .

*           *           *

I promised my readers that if I ever found out why Dr. Roger Sims (who played in the Bandon Playhouse productions of Camelot and Sound of Music) had left his practice as the premier periodontist in Southwestern Oregon, I would let them know. We have known all along it was some sort of health problem, but people were only guessing.

A friend of mine saw him at a car dealership in Coos Bay last week and asked one of the employees if they knew what he was suffering from. She was told that he has ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease) and is no longer able to practice dentistry. I know quite a bit about the disease as that is what took the life of my father. I do know that Dr. Sims has a daughter living in the Coos Bay area, which is good.

*           *           *

I was happy to see that a Marion County Grand Jury decided not to indict a West Salem High School choir teacher recently. The teacher had been accused of leaving the scene of a collision with an eight-year-old boy, who rode his skateboard into the side of her vehicle.

The lad was a neighbor of the teacher, and his parents did not want to call 9-1-1 or an ambulance. The teacher left briefly to take her son to school while her husband stayed behind at the scene.

My question is: why would she have been cited in the first place for "failure to perform the duties of a driver to injured persons" (essentially what we commonly call "hit and run.") Surely sounded like she made every effort to make sure he was OK.




As I See It

by Mary Schamehorn

Mary Schamehorn

January 07, 2015


I've chosen an eclectic group of pictures for this week's history lesson. The first, taken in November of 1979, is the grandstand at Dave Miller Field (BHS football field), named after the owner of Moore Mill & Lumber Co., who donated the lumber for the stadium, which was built by volunteers. Age eventually took its toll, and it was a sad day when the grandstand (on the south side of the field) was torn down and ultimately replaced by the cold steel risers that you see on the north side of the field today.

Grandstand at Dave Miller Field 1979
Grandstand at Dave Miller Field 1979

While watching the impressive Clydesdales in the Pasadena Rose Parade on New Year's Day, I thought about the time (June 1982) when Baron the Budweiser Clydesdale was filmed on the Bandon beach for a beer commercial. My original photo had no rocks in the background, but later, in my trusty darkroom, I was able to superimpose the rocks into the picture, which added depth to the photo. If you look closely enough, you will notice the surf lapping the sand just behind the horse . . .and again in front of the rocks. The picture, sans the rocks, made it onto the front page of Western World and also on the front cover of the KCK Corporation's People Pleaser newspaper, published by the owners of McKay's Market, on June 8, 1982.

Baron the Budweiser Clydesdale 1982
Baron the Budweiser Clydesdale 1982

The third picture was taken following the big wind storm of November 1975, when a barn pretty much blew down . . . I think up bear Creek, but I am not sure of the location. A lot of people lost trees, sheds and barns that day . . .

Wind storm November 1975
Wind storm November 1975

*           *           *

No one deserves more to be on the front page of Western World (Jan. 1) than RoseAnne and Bob Gates, who have been head chefs for the Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday dinners for many years.

Unfortunately, the long hours and limited early-morning help have taken a toll on them and RoseAnne has announced that although they will be willing to help next year, they won't be able to head up the kitchen crew.

Those of us who share the wonderful dinner prepared primarily by RoseAnne take for granted that it will taste exactly like we remember from our own holiday table (when mother was cooking), and that's how she's prepared the food for eight years.

But it's the behind-the-scenes work that is prompting them to "turn in their resignation" (if you can resign from a volunteer job). The day before the event, RoseAnne says they spend eight hours in the kitchen ... and then return at 3 a.m. on the day of the event to get the 12, 20-lb. turkeys and 9 hams into the ovens . . . so they will be ready when the homebound meals start heading out the door around 10:30.

RoseAnne understands that not many people want to arrive at The Barn at 3 a.m., and this year she and Bob were alone at that hour doing all the work themselves (and that includes making the dressing, the potatoes, etc). Chuck Salt generally handles the potatoes, but at Christmas time he was ill, so that also fell to Roseanne. Ginny Hall, head of volunteers, was able to provide some helpers for her during the day, but when it came time to clean up the kitchen, she and Bob were again alone. And at the end of the 14-hour day, she went home exhausted and let barn manager Jeff Norris know that this would be their last year as primary chefs.

I spoke with a woman who volunteered during mid-day, and she said had she had any idea that help was needed at 3 a.m., she would have definitely volunteered. And I think others would have, too, had they known that they were needed.

I often hear people say they would love to volunteer, but at certain jobs and certain hours there are a lot of people volunteering, so they don't feel they would be needed.

But I can tell you that at 3 a.m., your help would most definitely be welcome.

RoseAnne has kept track of everything she's done during all those years in the kitchen, and she will be ready and more than willing to share it with whomever steps forward.

She also has some ideas as to what group might be willing to take over, and I'll let you know what she finds out after she contacts them.

She mentioned that she was so appreciative of Amy Moss-Strong's editorial the previous week in Western World about Bandon's volunteers . . . and she also praised Ginny Hall for all the work she does organizing the volunteer corps.

You will never find a more dedicated volunteer than RoseAnne Gates, and she and Bob deserve to sit down and share a holiday meal with the rest of us.

*           *           *

I am sure that all of my readers who live in Bandon have noticed that the time and temperature sign is gone from the green area in front of Umpqua Bank.

There were a few comments on Facebook, including one man who said it wouldn't bother him because he could always determine the temperature. Not sure exactly what he meant, but for those of us who don't have temperature gauges in our older-model vehicles nor do we have them outside on our decks, that sign was a big help and always a source of conversation. I can remember, over the years when I worked at Western World, of taking pictures for the paper on an unusually hot day.

Sure, it wasn't the official temperature, but it gave us an idea of how hot (or cold) it was at that location.

And I miss it . . .

*           *           *

Tuesday, Jan. 6, the City will be honoring long-time administrative assistant Bev Lanier, who retired Dec. 31 after working for the city for 31 years. Stop by City Hall between the hours of 1 and 3, wish Bev well and have a piece of cake.

*           *           *

As Mayor I received a letter from the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation indicating they would be reviewing the First National Bank of Bandon building (commonly referred to as the Masonic Building) at the west end of Second Street for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places at their meeting in Eugene on Feb. 19-20.

This building, as we all know, was one of very few to have survived the Bandon Fire. I have heard many stories over the years because the Western World, owned by my grandfather at the time of the fire, was in that building, and that's where I went to work as a cub reporter/news editor in February of 1959. My office was on the mezzanine and there were still old photos and memorabilia of the Fire lying around in smoky boxes . . . considering that I went to work only 23 years after the Fire.

First National Bank of Bandon
First National Bank of Bandon

The Bandon Main Street Program (through its leader Harv Schubothe) is one of the proponents of the listing.

I certainly hope they are successful. A town that was wiped out by Fire doesn't have a lot of "really old" buildings, although I understand that 50-year-old properties may qualify in some cases.

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The weather has been so wonderful ... sun and no wind . . . what more could you ask for in late December and early January. We pretty much returned to normal winter weather Sunday, but still not a lot of rain. The winters have been getting so much better in the last few years ... compared to when I grew up here many years ago.

It's true we need the rain, but I can definitely do without the gale-force south winds.

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I received my first Shutterfly photo book in the mail this week and I was blown away by the quality. I still have a lot to learn, and hope that the others (old black and white pictures of Bandon, one just of lighthouses and another of beach scenes) will be better designed.

People who looked at it didn't seem to care . . . but five of the pictures were in the book twice, including one back-to-back picture of the lighthouse. Apparently they just had so many spaces to fill and I didn't give them enough pictures to work with, so they improvised. But it's still beautiful.

True, these books are expensive, but to me they are worth it and besides it definitely keeps me busy trying to figure out what my next book will look like.

One of my favorite places is the old stagecoach stop Patrick Creek Lodge on Highway 199 east of Crescent City and during one of my visits, I took several hundred pictures. I also made friends with one of the waitresses and I always hear from her at Christmas. I've decided to put a "Patrick Creek Lodge" book together for her as she is even in one of the pictures. I know she'll be thrilled.

It's an expensive, but very rewarding, "hobby," and who knows I may even sell a few books . . . to help cover my expenses.

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Since a lot of people make their vacation plans in January (particularly if they work for a large company), it's important to let BHS alumni know that an all-school reunion will be held Saturday, Aug. 22, at Ocean Crest Gym, which is observing its 75th anniversary.

I also know that the Class of 1965 is holding its 50-year reunion that same weekend, so there will be a lot of people in town.


previous columns by Mary Schamehorn